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Monday, April 19, 2010

Challange That Please, says the ALA


The American Library Association released its list of the “most challenged books of 2009,” this week, and the results are dismaying.

Why should the list make book-lovers nervous? Not because it shows that classics like To Kill a Mockingbird (fourth on the list), The Catcher in the Rye (number six), and The Color Purple (number nine) are still under siege, even generations after they were first released. Not because one of the newer entries is a picture book about penguins that offends some parents because of its portrayal of same-sex animal marriage (And Tango Makes Three, number two). Not even because the number one most challenged text is a book called ttyl, which is written entirely in text message-speak, and therefore reveals that enough of America’s youths are reading a book written entirely in text message-speak for parents to try to put a stop to it.
No, what’s alarming is not that grown-ups are trying to prevent kids from reading about racism in World War II-era Alabama or gay penguins or Internet-obsessed teenagers. It’s worrying that more parents aren’t challenging these books. The ranking is based on just 460 challenges nationwide. Granted, the ALA says many challenges go unreported, and claims the 460 number represents just 25 percent of the total. Still, even accounting for unreported complaints, parents lodged fewer than 2,000 challenges last year, which averages out to under 40 per state.
The books on the ALA list should make more than 2,000 parents nervous. In The Catcher in the Rye, a high school student orders a prostitute to the Manhattan hotel room where he’s fled after being kicked out of boarding school. To Kill a Mockingbird engages with some of our society’s most taboo subjects: race and rape.
more from the atlantic

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