Skip to main content

Just one more way China is destroying North America via The Great Lakes



Strange ? They can put this to plants and animals ...... But come invasive human scum they do not say a word. ( please read comments left by readers )thank you battleskin88


The aliens have landed and their favourite province is Ontario.
They may be tough to recognize because they aren't green with beady eyes and bulbous heads, but a Government of Ontario planrecommends drastic measures for dealing with the large number of invasive species.
"The ecological effects of invasive species are often irreversible and, once established, they are extremely difficult and costly to control and eradicate," reads the Ontario Invasive Species Strategic Plan.
Ontario is already part of a national plan called "An Invasive Alien Species Strategy for Canada", which was approved in 2004.
However, with 1,017 non-native vascular plants, Ontario has almost the same number as the rest of Canada at 1,384 species. The plan states Ontario is a haven for invading species due to the nature of its society, economy and geographic location.
The geographic location being key because it is at the end of the St. Lawrence Seaway and has multiple land and water entry points with the Great Lakes. Canada's most populous province also leads in the invading freshwater fish category with 26 known species.
While there is no analysis of the net cost in Ontario, the Commission for Environmental Cooperation said in 2009 the environmental affects and economic loss exceed $100 billion in the U.S. alone.
Toronto will spend $37 million over five years to cut and replace trees killed by the emerald ash borer and zebra mussels have cost Ontario Power producers $6.4 million per year. The Ontario Biodiversity Council also shows the aliens are affecting 20 per cent of the native species.
The report, which was posted this week on the province's environmental registry, recommends developing "rapid response protocols which respond to new infestations with an understanding of the social, economic and environmental impacts."
In addition to coordinating with all levels of government to design the plan of attack, it recommends giving the agencies the tools to, if necessary, eradicate the species quickly. more at Daily Brew

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Kim Hoelmer stood beneath a tree in eastern China a year ago and studied its leaves.  
He scanned a section as sunlight passed through the foliage, revealing the backlit image of the first thing he was looking for — an egg mass laid by a brown marmorated stink bug.




Hoelmer pulled the leaf down for a closer inspection and spotted the second thing he had hoped to see — evidence that a particular parasitic wasp had been there, too.

Bingo.

The scientist collected the eggs and returned to his lab at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, where he hopes to turn the wasp into a weapon to stop the stink bug.

The invasive species was first identified in Allentown, Pa., in 1998, but researchers there think it had been around for at least a couple of years. It hit Ohio in 2007 and now is in 33 states, including every state east of the Mississippi River and along the Pacific coast.

The bug, they say, probably hitched a ride on containers from Asia, where it damages fruit and soybeans from China to Japan.

The emerald ash borer arrived in much the same manner from China and has left in its wake millions of dead trees.

Adult Female brown marmorated stink bug


Where it is found, the brown marmorated stink bug, which has no natural predators here, outnumbers native stink bugs 10 to 1. And they eat at least 100 different plants. Last summer, the stink bug damaged 20 percent to 100 percent of the fruit crops in some areas of Maryland and West Virginia, according to government entomologists.



Trissolcus


In Asia, however, the bug is kept in check by a wasp in the genus Trissolcus. This wasp preys exclusively on the eggs of the brown marmorated stink bug. It simply injects its own eggs into the stink bugs' eggs. Within days, wasp larva hatch and feed on the developing stink bugs.

Nasty and effective.

Hoelmer is studying the Trissolcus in hopes of one day setting the wasp loose on the brown marmorated stink bug in the U.S.
"Our approach is to introduce a permanent solution," said Hoelmer, who works in the agency's Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit.
Right now, it might be the only thing that works. Commonly used pesticides have had little effect on the bug.



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

1914 Germany Afrikaner farmer Agreement

thank you Etienne 
translated from Afrikaner to EnglishTo all the people of the white race all over the world, most of all to the German nation: This is an important agreement Concerning the South African Boer people and the German nation. It has to do with an agreement between the Boer rebellion and the German troops in Southwest Africa. The Boer rebellion were lead by leaders of the Afrikaaner nation (General Manie Maritz, General SG Maritz, General Koss Delarey) and who’ll be fought against the English in the Second Anglo-Boer war from 1899 to 1902, where the Afrikaaner nation under hun president In Paul Kruger ulcers completely humiliated by the English when ze ulcers forced to sign the Treaty of Vereeniging in 1902. The atrocities committed against the Boers in the Concentration camps ulcers horriffic to say the least, and at least 30 000 Boer women and Children Were driven from hun farms Which Were torched under Lord Kitchener’s Scorched Earth policies. The attached files are an ima…

Gangs are everywhere, including the burbs, not to worry though 'We Have A Program For That"

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2006
Hardcore Gangs Hit Ohio Suburbs GANGS IN THE ’BURBS
Subversive element creeping beyond Columbus’ borders
Last year, Westerville North High School suspended two students who flashed MS-13 hand signs and drew gang insignia during an English-asa-second-language class. MS-13, or Mara Salvatrucha, is a notoriously violent street gang with roots in Los Angeles. It was formed by immigrants from El Salvador.

Gang crime isn’t nearly as serious or common in the suburbs as in some Columbus neighborhoods, but suburban schools and police departments are increasingly on watch.
"It’s not so centralized in the inner city as it used to be," said Pat Brooks, a veteran Columbus police gang unit officer.

Suburban police call Brooks and his colleagues when they suspect gang activity in their jurisdictions.

Most of the crack dealers in Reynoldsburg are gang members who live in Columbus, said Tye Downard, a Reynoldsburg police narcotics detective.

They go there to make mor…