Skip to main content

Possible Whiskey Rebellion of 2011?


The Whiskey Rebellion of 1794

There was an uprising in Pennsylvania counties after Alexander Hamilton began taxing Whiskey in 1791. Scottish and Irish settlers resented the tax. Whiskey was an important economic commodity to them.
Rioting broke out in 1794 and the president at the time, none other than George Washington, sent troops to quell the rioting. Hamilton hoped to set an example using two rebels, whom he convicted for treason, but Washington later pardoned them.  Hamilton's tax was repealed in 1802.More at source
Possible Whiskey Rebellion of 2011?
Kentucky lawmakers, citing the singular downside to aged whiskey, have proposed a bill aimed at correcting what they claim is unfair treatment in the tax code toward bourbon distillers.
The Aged Distilled Spirits Competitiveness Act of 2011, backed by the entire Kentucky House delegation, would overhaul a provision they say puts bourbon distillers at a competitive disadvantage against other sectors of the liquor industry.
The tax provision requires distillers to carry over costs associated with their inventory until the bourbon is ready to be poured into bottles -- meaning the distillers can't deduct those expenses until then.  But that process can take as long as 18 years. The more complex the flavor, the more costly the tax implications.
Bourbon manufacturers who lobbied for the bill say, with nearly 5 million barrels currently in the aging process in Kentucky, their industry is not on a level playing field with manufacturers of spirits that don't require natural aging -- like vodka or gin.
"Not only does it make our cost structure higher than it should be here in the U.S., but it affects our ability to be competing on the world markets," said Max Shapira, president of the Heaven Hill Distilleries.
Under the proposed law, distillers could deduct the interest expense to finance their inventory as it's incurred.  Rep. Geoff Davis, R-Ky., who introduced the bill along with Rep. Ben Chandler, D-Ky., described it as a measure to "protect jobs in one of the commonwealth's signature industries."
Kentucky produces most of the world's bourbon -- a product and industry the Kentucky Distillers' Association estimates is responsible for nearly 10,000 jobs in the state. The association, which supports the new bill, estimates Kentucky's distilleries ship $1.5 billion worth of the stuff ever year.more

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

1914 Germany Afrikaner farmer Agreement

thank you Etienne 
translated from Afrikaner to EnglishTo all the people of the white race all over the world, most of all to the German nation: This is an important agreement Concerning the South African Boer people and the German nation. It has to do with an agreement between the Boer rebellion and the German troops in Southwest Africa. The Boer rebellion were lead by leaders of the Afrikaaner nation (General Manie Maritz, General SG Maritz, General Koss Delarey) and who’ll be fought against the English in the Second Anglo-Boer war from 1899 to 1902, where the Afrikaaner nation under hun president In Paul Kruger ulcers completely humiliated by the English when ze ulcers forced to sign the Treaty of Vereeniging in 1902. The atrocities committed against the Boers in the Concentration camps ulcers horriffic to say the least, and at least 30 000 Boer women and Children Were driven from hun farms Which Were torched under Lord Kitchener’s Scorched Earth policies. The attached files are an ima…

Gangs are everywhere, including the burbs, not to worry though 'We Have A Program For That"

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2006
Hardcore Gangs Hit Ohio Suburbs GANGS IN THE ’BURBS
Subversive element creeping beyond Columbus’ borders
Last year, Westerville North High School suspended two students who flashed MS-13 hand signs and drew gang insignia during an English-asa-second-language class. MS-13, or Mara Salvatrucha, is a notoriously violent street gang with roots in Los Angeles. It was formed by immigrants from El Salvador.

Gang crime isn’t nearly as serious or common in the suburbs as in some Columbus neighborhoods, but suburban schools and police departments are increasingly on watch.
"It’s not so centralized in the inner city as it used to be," said Pat Brooks, a veteran Columbus police gang unit officer.

Suburban police call Brooks and his colleagues when they suspect gang activity in their jurisdictions.

Most of the crack dealers in Reynoldsburg are gang members who live in Columbus, said Tye Downard, a Reynoldsburg police narcotics detective.

They go there to make mor…