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“We are Preparing for Massive Civil War,”


In a riveting interview on TruNews Radio, Wednesday, private investigator Doug Hagmann said high-level, reliable sources told him the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is preparing for “massive civil war” in America.
“Folks, we’re getting ready for one massive economic collapse,” Hagmann told TruNews host Rick Wiles.
“We have problems . . . The federal government is preparing for civil uprising,” he added, “so every time you hear about troop movements, every time you hear about movements of military equipment, the militarization of the police, the buying of the ammunition, all of this is . . . they (DHS) are preparing for a massive uprising.”

Enemy at the Gates

By Paul Steinbach 
5/1/2006
The blast could be heard clearly inside Memorial Stadium, where 84,501 football fans had gathered last October to watch the University of Oklahoma play host to Kansas State. Reverberations beyond the OU campus, meanwhile, have been shockingly minimal. 
Just what took place within earshot of so many Sooners on that mild night in Norman remains a mystery to most. Junior mechanical engineering major Joel Hinrichs III, perhaps the only person who could say for sure, is dead of his own device — a three-pound bomb believed to be made out of triacetone triperoxide, a volatile explosive known as “Mother of Satan.” 
Hinrichs blew himself up on a park bench within 200 yards of the stadium, in an area known as the South Oval. The FBI, which investigated the incident, issued a bulletin the next day advising facility managers elsewhere to step up their security awareness at upcoming games. But whether or not Hinrichs meant for others to die with him is not entirely clear. “I believe he went for a large open space where he wouldn’t harm anyone but himself,” Hinrichs’ father, Joel Hinrichs Jr., told The Oklahoma Daily student newspaper two days after the bombing. “He was aware of the fact that he was going to make an indelible impression on 85,000 football fans. He might have said, ‘That’s you, this is me, good-bye.’ But I’m just speculating. He’s not here to say if I’m right or not.” 
Despite a dearth of national media coverage regarding the incident, there has been plenty of speculation in the seven months since. For reasons that should be obvious, the university was quick to judge the matter a suicide — the act of a lonely, frequently depressed student. However, the Northeast Intelligence Network, a web site founded by private investigator Douglas Hagmann (homelandsecurityus.com), reported in March that a local law enforcement official involved in the Hinrichs bombing investigation is “disgusted that the truth is being withheld from the public.” This official, described by Hagmann as “confidential but wellvetted,” went on to state, “This was a premeditated act of terrorism that involved more than Hinrichs and was supposed to kill and hurt a lot of people.” 
“Several recent incidences of violent extremists in the United States who are committed to fighting here and abroad have underscored the threat to the United States and our interests posed by individuals radicalized at home. Our best defenses against this threat are well informed and equipped families, local communities, and institutions. The Federal Government will invest in intelligence to understand this threat and expand community engagement and development programs to empower local communities. And the Federal Government, drawing on the expertise and resources from all relevant agencies, will clearly communicate our policies and 
intentions, listening to local concerns, tailoring policies to address regional concerns, and making clear that our diversity is part of our strength—not a source of division or insecurity.”
—National Security Strategy, May 2010
Throughout history, violent extremists—individuals who support or commit ideologically-motivated violence to further political goals—have promoted messages of divisiveness and justified the killing of innocents. The United States Constitution recognizes freedom of expression, even for individuals who espouse unpopular or even hateful views. But when individuals or groups choose to further their grievances or ideologies through violence, by engaging in violence themselves or by recruiting and encouraging others to do so, it becomes the collective responsibility of the U.S. Government and the American people to take a stand. In recent history, our country has faced plots by neo-Nazis and other anti-Semitic hate groups, racial supremacists, and international and domestic terrorist groups; and since the September 11 attacks, we have faced an expanded range of plots and attacks in the United States inspired or directed by al-Qa’ida and its affiliates and adherents as well as other violent extremists. Supporters of these groups and their associated ideologies come from different socioeconomic 
backgrounds, ethnic and religious communities, and areas of the country, making it difficult to predict where violent extremist narratives will resonate. And as history has shown, the prevalence of particular violent extremist ideologies changes over time, and new threats will undoubtedly arise in the future. (  paragraph 2 of A. The Challenge)

Fact Sheet: The Department of

Homeland Security’s Approach to

Countering Violent Extremism


 Hagmann goes on to say that his sources tell him the concerns of the DHS stem from a collapse of the U.S. dollar and the hyperinflation a collapse in the value of the world’s primary reserve currency implies to a nation of 311 million Americans, who, for the significant portion of the population, is armed.
Uprisings in Greece is, indeed, a problem, but an uprising of armed Americans becomes a matter of serious national security, a point addressed in a recent report by the Pentagon and highlighted as a vulnerability and threat to the U.S. during war-game exercises at the Department of Defense last year, according to one of the DoD’s war-game participants, Jim Rickards, author of Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global CrisisRead more:  thank you Stacie

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