Skip to main content

Rumor has it; Plug Pulled and Mandela Is DEAD at age of 94?



A reliable source has revealed that Nelson Mandela’s life support machine was shut down and he has died in hospital aged 94. According to the source, the iconic Mandela died last night while he was still in hospital for the recurring lung infection that left him in critical condition for several days.
Rumors have flooded the newspapers and the internet with several sources reporting his death days earlier in a cruel attempt to fool the public and to upset the many people who have respect for this great humanitarian. The loss of the great man will be felt across the world.
Earlier today one of our writers, Laura Oneale, wrote an article questioning whether or not Nelson Mandela was still alive. He had been in the hospital 19 days for a recurring lung infection. As speculation surrounding his health continued to grow with many asking whether he was still alive or if, in fact, he had died. Until recently authorities would only confirm that he was on a life support system and remained in a critical condition.
Authorities have confirmed that Nelson Mandela has been taken off his life support machine, adding fuel to the speculation that he had died. Because of this, the rumor has been spreading that Nelson Mandela died last night and that the government and his family have “kept a lid” on the news because of American Present Obama’s upcoming trip to South Africa. Obviously, the president’s visit will be overshadowed by the announcement of the Noble Prize wining Mandela.
The Noble Prize winning humanitarian Nelson Mandela had his life support shut down after he died last night aged 94 at the end of a long battle with illness that ended with his hospitalization and finally his death. While his health problems started in 2011, it was the summer of this year when his condition worsened. >>more<<
thank you Right of Return to Europe; for African White Refugees

Early Colonial Flags of South Africa

     The Republic of South Africa is a country located at the southernmost tip of Africa. It became a stopover point on the spice route between the Europe and the Far East. In 1652, the first formal city of Cape Town was established by the Dutch. The discovery of diamonds in 1867 and gold in 1886 spurred the interest of other European powers and soon the natural wealth of the area and the resulting immigration intensified the subjugation of the native inhabitants.

South Africa’s whites-only town, Orania

WELCOME to Orania, South Africa: a whites-only enclave established in 1991 during the dying years of apartheid.
The town in the sparsely populated Karoo region is inhabited only by Afrikaners.
These descendants of Dutch-speaking migrants who arrived in South Africa in 1652 with Jan van Riebeeck, now make up six percent of the “Rainbow Nation’s” population.
But they make up 100 per cent of rural Orania.
It was the Afrikaners who formed the backbone of the National Party that introduced apartheid, and many South Africans regard Orania’s residents as little more than latter-day bittereinders – term used for Boer War holdouts – who rage against today’s majority rule.
Perhaps ironically, Orania’s existence is protected under article 235 of South Africa’s Constitution which ensures right to self-determination.
The legislation was adopted after the end of apartheid, following years of fighting against the system of separate homelands for native blacks.
“This republic is growing,” proclaimed Quintin Diederichs, a former rugby player who became a resident three years ago.
“We have fifty companies that we have created with our own hands,” said Diederichs.
But beneath the seemingly safe and secure environment lurks paranoia, some residents believe that one day blacks might turn against them.
A waiter at a bar said that he fears “black South Africans will kill all white people” when peace icon Nelson Mandela dies.
The 94-year-old who was jailed by the apartheid regime became the country’s first black president in 1994.
Upon his release from prison in 1990 he preached reconciliation and non-racialism.
Orania is probably not what the revered statesman envisaged for a new South Africa.
Former South African President Nelson Mandela with Betsie Verwoerd, widow of apartheid’s architect Hendrik Verwoerd, in Orania in 1995.


Short URL: http://www.newsnet14.com/?p=126046

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

1914 Germany Afrikaner farmer Agreement

thank you Etienne 
translated from Afrikaner to EnglishTo all the people of the white race all over the world, most of all to the German nation: This is an important agreement Concerning the South African Boer people and the German nation. It has to do with an agreement between the Boer rebellion and the German troops in Southwest Africa. The Boer rebellion were lead by leaders of the Afrikaaner nation (General Manie Maritz, General SG Maritz, General Koss Delarey) and who’ll be fought against the English in the Second Anglo-Boer war from 1899 to 1902, where the Afrikaaner nation under hun president In Paul Kruger ulcers completely humiliated by the English when ze ulcers forced to sign the Treaty of Vereeniging in 1902. The atrocities committed against the Boers in the Concentration camps ulcers horriffic to say the least, and at least 30 000 Boer women and Children Were driven from hun farms Which Were torched under Lord Kitchener’s Scorched Earth policies. The attached files are an ima…

Gangs are everywhere, including the burbs, not to worry though 'We Have A Program For That"

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2006
Hardcore Gangs Hit Ohio Suburbs GANGS IN THE ’BURBS
Subversive element creeping beyond Columbus’ borders
Last year, Westerville North High School suspended two students who flashed MS-13 hand signs and drew gang insignia during an English-asa-second-language class. MS-13, or Mara Salvatrucha, is a notoriously violent street gang with roots in Los Angeles. It was formed by immigrants from El Salvador.

Gang crime isn’t nearly as serious or common in the suburbs as in some Columbus neighborhoods, but suburban schools and police departments are increasingly on watch.
"It’s not so centralized in the inner city as it used to be," said Pat Brooks, a veteran Columbus police gang unit officer.

Suburban police call Brooks and his colleagues when they suspect gang activity in their jurisdictions.

Most of the crack dealers in Reynoldsburg are gang members who live in Columbus, said Tye Downard, a Reynoldsburg police narcotics detective.

They go there to make mor…