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Despite communities objection against a Casino to be built near Farmers Markert ealier this year; St. Jacobs Farmers' Market burns down near Waterloo, Ont.

Falling on deaf ears
Elmira Independent Editorial
Woolwich councillors have consulted the public, but did they listen?
That’s the question that really needs to be answered, after Tuesday night’s decision that opens the door to a potential casino for Woolwich Township.
From the start, this process has seemed slanted towards a casino.
We could look at the initial meeting, in which OLG officials presented a beautifully crafted list of potential benefits of a casino — promising millions in potential revenue, with only a small portion of the discussion talking about the potential cost.
We could look at the poorly executed postcard survey that listed all of the potential benefits of a casino, but, again, none of the potential harm.
Only one postcard was sent to each home, yet every voting member of that household was eligible to participate, something that was not made clear on the postcard. It’s rather disingenuous to suggest the response (at 11 per cent of eligible voters) was poor, when not every eligible voter received a card. And while residents had the opportunity to vote online, that was also limited to one vote per household computer — again, making it difficult for all eligible voters to have a say.
Since voter turnout in the last municipal election hovered around 27 per cent, a response of 11 per cent of residents is actually a good response, particularly as the responses took place in the days leading up to Christmas — but it doesn’t mean much, if it is ignored.
The fact that 62 per cent of respondents were opposed to the casino proposal, and that the vast majority of residents who made presentations at council, and who submitted letters to the township, were also opposed,
makes it difficult for us to understand how this council could have made the decision it did this week.


St. Jacobs Farmers' Market burns down 

Sep 2, 2013 5:45 AM ET 

A sprinkler system could have saved the main building at the St. Jacobs Farmers' Market north of Waterloo, Ont., from being destroyed in a fire, according to Woolwich Fire Department Chief Rick Pederson.
Pederson made the remark at a news conference at noon on Monday as he briefed media on the latest on the fire that destroyed a popular southern Ontario tourist destination and local landmark.
Damage from the fire could be as high as $2 million, according to Pederson.
"The main two-storey building is a total loss," said Deputy Chief Dale Martin earlier on Monday.
Martin said the that the fire department received a call around 1:48 a.m. ET regarding a fire at the market.
"On arrival, the farmers' market building — the main building — was totally involved in fire, coming out through the roof. At that point we concentrated on the other buildings around here, where the livestock sales happen," said Martin.
No one was hurt in the fire, said Martin.
Between 30 and 40 firefighters from four different stations battled the fire, according to Martin. The blaze was under control by around 6 a.m


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